SUGARY DRINKS INCREASE RISK OF KIDNEY STONES, SAYS BOSTON RESEARCHER

May 24, 2013

By Jane Brown

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Sugary beverages are known to contribute to obesity and tooth decay, but there is another reason to kick the soft drink habit.  American researchers say daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may increase the risk of kidney stones.  Study participants who consumed one or more servings of sugar-sweetened, non-cola soft drinks a day had a more than 30 percent higher chance of developing a kidney stone, compared to those who had less than one serving a week. Other sugar-sweetened beverages, such as cola and punch, were also associated with a higher risk.  Co-author Gary Curhan, at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and professor at Harvard Medical School, says the increased risk was the same for men and women.  Curhan says sugar in the form of fructose “seems to increase the risk.”  An estimated 20 percent of men and 10 percent of women will develop a kidney stone at some point in their lives.

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